Maintaining protein nutrition in chickens

Necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens can be caused due to the increased
level of protein, 2-6 weeks post hatching. This is because of the over growth
of C. perfringens in the small digestive system, increasing from a typical
level of 10 4 CFU to 10 7 or 10 9 CFU per gram of digesta and causing harmful diseases.
With the increased dietary protein level, there will likewise be an increased activity of the trypsin in the small digestive system. This will, thusly, prompt to speedier arrival of coccidia from their oocytes which will lead so dynamic as to be less responsive to immunization.
In situations where such bacterial and protozoan are probably going to
prevail, it might then be advantageous, among different measures, to reduce the supply of protein and maintain it underneath the prescribed range. It is likewise important to consider the amino acid balance of the protein source to be utilized. Methionine and glycine, for instance, have been known to empower growth and establishment of C. perfringens and different pathogens in the gut.
Accordingly, the utilization of protein sources having over the top measures of these amino acids ought to be limited. Additionally, there are some protein sources, for example, cottonseed meal, raw soybean, and flax cakes, which contain varying measures of anti-nutritional factors, for example, trypsin inhibitors, gossypol, and glucosides. At the point when ingested by the bird, these components would then apply some damaging consequences for the small digestive tract, in this manner impeding
the safe mechanical assembly having nearby as well as systemic defensive capacities. Excessive utilization of such protein sources in the diet ought
to, therefore, be avoided as well.

Problems faced by the laying hens

Problems faced by the laying hens

Declining day length

Hens are delicate to day length, and especially to the course in which day length is changing, with regards to laying eggs. Declining day lengths demoralize egg production.

Improper nutrition

Hens require a balanced and adequate diet to keep up egg production. Every egg contains significant amount of protein and vitality, which should first be consumed by the hen as a feature of its day by day nourishment admission. Too minimal dietary vitality or an irregularity of amino acids can bring about discouraged egg creation.

Molt

After a hen has been delivering eggs for a while, she turns out to probably molt. Molting and egg production are not commonly good, so when molting happens, egg production stops. The rest from egg laying permits the hen to reestablish its plumage condition by shedding old quills and growing new ones.

Disease

Numerous poultry diseases will influence egg production. In the event that a disease is suspected, it is vital to counsel a poultry veterinarian immediately. A timely diagnosis may permit compelling treatment for a few sicknesses. On account of certain destructive diseases for example, very pathogenic Avian Influenza, a speedy diagnosis may prevent losses of entire flocks in whole area, and limit the danger of zoonotic transmission of lethal illness from chickens to people, e.g., bird flu.

Main issues to consider for organic Poultry Production

If you are considering establishing an organic poultry enterprise there are many issues you will need to think about. These are some of the most important:
• Soil type: The soil needs to be relatively free draining. Heavy, wetland not only makes access difficult, but it also creates more challenges for the birds;
• Shelter: Poultry needs a sheltered environment. Exposed locations should be avoided if possible;
• Labour: Organic poultry production is more labour intensive than conventional systems; the birds are housed in smaller groups, often in mobile housing. As the houses are often moved around the farm, there may be instances where the birds are some distance from the farm buildings;
• Infrastructure: Water should be available in the house (both at the brooding and rearing stages), and preferably also on the range. You will need good access all year round, to feed, observe and manage the birds. At certain points in the rotation, the houses may be some distance from the
farmyard and this may mean a significant amount of travelling, sometimes in less than ideal weather conditions;
• Capital: A considerable amount of capital investment is required to establish a successful and efficient organic poultry production unit of any reasonable size. This may, depending on whether there are existing slaughter facilities available to you, also require setting up a processing unit on-farm;
• Feed: The move towards 100% organic ration, increasing feed prices and the emphasis organic principles place on homegrown feed means that feed is a major consideration when considering setting up or converting to an organic poultry system.

NEONATAL POULTRY NUTRITION

Over the last five decades, improvements in nutrition and genetic selection have reduced the time required to produce a 2 Kg broiler within 1.7 FCR. The neonatal period is defined as the first seven days of the production cycle after hatch. It is a crucial time when the chick requires special management and nutrition. Efforts to control metabolic disorders such as ascites and leg problems have led to recommending early feed restriction during the first two weeks post-hatch. Thus, it is essential to know the effect of poultry management practices on subsequent chick development. A paper presented in the Ohio university explains the importance of the relationship of neonatal nutrition to muscle development. Muscle growth and development can be divided into two distinct periods: hyperplasia and hypertrophy. Hyperplasia is an embryonic period characterized by proliferation of muscle fiber number whereas hypertrophy is a post-hatch muscle growth that results in the enlargement of existing muscle fibers. Nutritional deprivation has a significant effect on myoblast cells. The research was conducted to evaluate the effects of an immediate post-hatch feed restriction on breast muscle formation. The increased number of nuclei in muscle fibers correlates with increased synthesis of protein and muscle fiber size enlargement. Myoblast cells are extremely responsive to the mitogenic effects of their environment, including nutrition. A 42-day length of a study conducted with feed restriction on the neonatal chickens showed a significant difference morphologically in the development and structure of the breast muscle between the feed restricted and unrestricted diet treatments. It also increased the deposition of fat in the breast muscle of the birds with the 20% feed restriction.
The Bottom Line Nutrient deprivation in the first few days after hatch may interfere with normal muscle protein development in broiler chicks. However, if you believe that flavor and juiciness follow the fat, there may
be some benefit from an early feed.

What is the effect of KiFAY on IGF-1 and protein accretion in broilers?

A comparative study was performed to investigate the efficacy of KiFAY™ as a feed additive on performance parameters, thyroid, and pancreatic hormone levels in broilers. Ninety birds (Vencobb 400) were randomly divided into three groups viz., Control (no DL-methionine supplementation), Treatment1 (containing added DL-methionine) and Treatment2 (containing KiFAY™ and without DL-methionine
supplementation). The performance parameters (weekly body weight, body weight gain, feed intake, and feed consumption ratio) were recorded and calculated during the whole study of 4 weeks.

Analysis of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF1), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating Hormone (TSH) were performed at the end of the study. The results show that birds on supplementation of KiFAY™ performed significantly (p<0.001) better than other treatments. The weekly body weight, body weight gain, feed in-take and feed consumption ratio improved in KiFAY™ treated birds. The study shows an increase in insulin and IGF1 levels (p<0.001) in KiFAY™ than other treatments.

Serum T3, T4 and TSH levels in the treatment2 were higher than other treatments (p<0.001). The KiFAY™ supplementation was able to improve performance with associated responses at a hormonal level in broilers.

What is The Term Matrix Related to The Poultry Feed Industry?

Matrix is a term people will generally relate to the Keanu Reeves; even google will present you with this as a first page result. However matrix in the feed analogy is more related to something mathematical. The words digestible nutrients of feed ingredients and matrix are generally used as synonyms.  But matrix actually represents the nutrients available in the feed additive together with the nutrients spared or made available by use of the same additive in the feed formulation.  It represents the total nutrition provided to the animal body directly or indirectly by affecting the digestibility of feed. So, what is the use of matrix? We all remember our schooling days in mathematics and associate with a name called as Linear programming problems acronym as LPP. These are mathematical equations to link variables together to extract optimum results. One can set the key parameters such as price, dosage, availability, standards as variables with monetary profits as realistic outcomes. To give an example of LPP, let’s try this, for what combination of three machines A, B and C can work together with efficiency using each other’s limitations on different levels of time, use, power and accuracy to obtain an algorithm best suitable to manufacture maximum units of D in the least possible time, consuming least electricity and maintaining quality standards by reducing standard deviation. In layman terms it will give you a method of best utilization of available resources. So a matrix will enable us to use  LPP, which are now-a-days coded in software’s that help in formulating feed.

So how does one calculate the matrix of a feed additive? The answer is to run digestibility trials. These trials evaluate the nutritional availability from the ingredient to the animal. The availability can be further refined as in case of terms in energy as gross energy, metabolizable energy and so on. The digestibility trials also are needed to be refined on the basis of species, age, breed, sex and diet. A mature broiler breeder will have an ability to digest nutrients from corn which will be a different for a layer chick and a corn-soy diet with fishmeal will have different matrix then a corn-soy-bran diet with lupins. Once individual ingredient digestibility values are calculated the nutrional content can be corrected with these fractions to determine their true potential in feed formulations. Many phytogenic origin products have tried to replace certain high cost matrix products in the feed. But very few have succeeded to relate the plant sourced additive in terms of a compatible matrix value. The matrix can be also formed on the basis of growth studies where ingredient for ingredient replacement can be tested by using performance parameters. A correlation graph can be utilized to compare the new ingredients which fit better in an LPP for cost reduction with the old ones, falling short on the price front or other long term frontiers. In case of certain additives like phytase enzymes which result in mobilization phosphorus, the tibial ash content comparisons are also used to form matrix.

An in vivo digestibility assay in case of poultry ideally focuses of ileal sampling of digesta and deductively analyzing the same with oral fed feed. The birds are sacrificed and digesta is sampled at different levels of the gut to understand the digestibility of ingredients. As ileum is the terminal region of the small intestine and digestion is considered at its optimum here, the feed sampled in these zones is used for developing a matrix. The fecal collection is generally contaminated with renal excretions and is not considered as ideal to evaluate digestibility of precision fed feed. The most accurate theoretical method to estimate digestibility values is to use cecectomized roosters. Only few attempts to replicate the digestive values in vitro are successful and are not as accurate as in vivo methods. Most of the values tested in vitro were based on activity of enzymes on a certain feed grain and do not replicate real time complexities of in vivo trials.

Research is now moving to the molecular level, and ultimately it is the nutrients that are utilized at a cellular level that matter the most. Current digestibility studies focus on the nutrients absorbed from the intestinal lumen to the blood, whereas growth studies compare the net benefits from the additive. In the future our goal should be a point of intersection between these two studies with molecular markers used to light up our path to the least cost matrix for success.